General Green Card

Effect On Green Card And Naturalization Of Using Public Or Government Benefits

I & my wife are completing 5 years now on US Green Card, but are apprehensive to go ahead and file for our US Citizenship under the current circumstances. We also read that PR's who are using state or federal benefits are more susceptible to denials. I am making close to 200K salary and not dependent on any govt sponsored benefits or funds. But our kid has been diagnosed for Autism and he is receiving services from Department of Developmental Disabilities (DDD). The State alone is not paying for his services but we are primarily being billed on our private medical insurance for his therapy sessions every week. The school he is attending may be getting some funds for his additional care at school, considering his medical condition. Our questions are: Since we have been using DDD services for genuine medical reasons and I am in the higher salary bracket, would this be an issue for us in getting our Citizenship? Are the denials only for low income groups who are getting benefits from the government? Should we wait for some more time to apply for Citizenship?

Watch the Video on this FAQ - Effect on green card and naturalization of using public or government benefits

Video Transcript:

Under the current regulations the prohibited benefits are: 

Unless the context shows otherwise, all answers here were provided by Rajiv and were compiled and reported by our editorial team from comments and blog on immigration.com

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The Impact of the NTA Memo

Under new deportation and denial policy 2018, I have following questions if I want to renew green card after 10 years. Can green card renewal I 90 be denied because of some common errors like forgot to submit copy of old green card, or any court document ( removal proceedings canceled without prejudice). Will I get deported if GC is denied due to minor administrative error?

Unless the context shows otherwise, all answers here were provided by Rajiv and were compiled and reported by our editorial team from comments and blog on immigration.com

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What Are Different Wage Levels For H-1B And Green Card Jobs?

I am currently on my CPT(masters student) & working as full time employee in Cincinnati, OH. I would be converting to OPT in Dec,2018. My employer is fine to file H1B for the next year. My current pay is b/w 60k-65k/annum. I heard that min wage should be 65K for H1B. And even if H1B is picked, there could be chances of rejection at the time of RFE. Will the wage between 60k-65K is ok or should it be more than 65K? I have gone through couple of other websites to explore on this. According to FLCDataCenter.com, I gave Ohio, Cincinnati(Hamilton county) and occupation as software developers, applications--it displayed 4 different wage levels. My current pay falls close to Wage Level 1 but above 60K. would it still cause any issue for H1B? Could you throw some light on this.

Unless the context shows otherwise, all answers here were provided by Rajiv and were compiled and reported by our editorial team from comments and blog on immigration.com

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Substantial transcription for video: 

Discussion Topics, Thursday 2 August, 2018:

FAQ: What are different wage levels for H-1B and green card jobs? || Travel outside the USA when a case is pending || The impact of the NTA memo Other: Green card renewal requirements/NTA policy || Getting promoted after getting green card || CPT and NTA policy || Past misrepresentation in immigration documents || Public assistance || Disclosing traffic tickets in naturalization || How soon can I leave after green card approval || 60 days grace period on H-1B changing status and quota issue || NTA Memo || Consequences of H-1B denial || Misclassification of H-1B job || EAD, AP and H-1B interaction || Couple applying for naturalization || Having two employers file for H-1B simultaneously || H-4 EAD

USCIS to Recall Incorrectly Dated Green Cards

On May 14, 2018, USCIS will begin recalling approximately 8,543 Permanent Resident Cards (also known as Green Cards) due to a production error. The Green Cards were for approved Form I-751, Petition to Remove Conditions of Residence for spouses of U.S. citizens. The cards were printed with an incorrect “Resident Since” date and mailed between February and April 2018.

Team Notes: 
Agency: 

Must I Carry My Green Card With Me At All Times?

Can I keep the notarized copy of my green card instead of original green card? Because I think it’s risky to carry GC all the time and have fear of it getting lost. cost and wait time for replacing GC is very high. When I will travel out of town or government buildings I can take my GC with me. But for other day to day routine travel can I keep my GC safe at home ? What is the maximum penalty I have to pay if random checked by immigration officer (very unlikely) I provide my driving license and notarized copy of GC? Is it very serious offense ? Have you seen people getting into immigration(USCIS) trouble for not carrying original GC? Do we have to do police complaint if GC is lost? If yes then can you please explain the procedure, and forms to fill.

Unless the context shows otherwise, all answers here were provided by Rajiv and were compiled and reported by our editorial team from comments and blog on immigration.com

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USCIS Updates Webpage to Share More Accurate Processing Times

WASHINGTON—U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) launched a pilot to test a redesigned processing times webpage that displays the data for all forms in an easier-to-read format and also tests a new way of collecting data and calculating the processing times for some forms.

Immigration Law : 
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Citizenship and Naturalization: 

International Travel as a Permanent Resident

1. What documents do I need to travel outside the United States?
2. What documents do I need to present to reenter the United States?
3. Does travel outside the United States affect my permanent resident status?
4. What if my trip abroad will last longer than 1 year?
5. What if I lose my green card or reentry permit or it is stolen or destroyed while I am temporarily traveling outside of the United States?

1. In general, you will need to present a passport from your country of citizenship or your refugee travel document to travel to a foreign country.  In addition, the foreign country may have additional entry/exit requirements (such as a visa).  For information on foreign entry and exit requirements, see the D

Unless the context shows otherwise, all answers here were provided by Rajiv and were compiled and reported by our editorial team from comments and blog on immigration.com

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